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Bilingual Barnyard [Video Post]

An amazing percentage of childhood seems to involve the study of barnyard animal sounds. Clearly... this is information every urban toddler needs to know. Personally, I think she'd benefit from learning to distinguish between a car alarm and an ambulance siren, but then again, this sentiment probably explains why no one is banging down my door to write a children's book...

After my recent phonetic spellings of accents, I decided this conversation really necessitated an audio component. So I roped Billy into our second video post (see our first here). Our bilingual parenting has revealed that our Spanish and English barnyard animals speak different languages, too!

Technical note: Sorry about the sporadic blurriness. I don't know... maybe the camera was trying to focus on our awesome studio-esque Atlanta backdrop.



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13 comments

  1. Hahah yes! Adrian and I have discovered a lot of these differences too. It's so interesting to think about these noises you've always associated with these animals and how someone somewhere else has a completely different noise associated with the same animal. Makes you wonder what else you've learned differently!

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  2. Sammy sat in my lap and watched this and was giggling and smiling the whole time.

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  3. Glad you both enjoyed it! And yes, Emily it DOES make you wonder what else you've learned differently. I have a feeling these will keep popping up. Who knew? We never discussed barnyard noises when we were dating! :)

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  4. I was laughing out loud--- one of Gerber and mine my first arguments was about what sound does a sheep make? I was shocked to know that spanish sheep make a "meh, meh" sound. Who knew??? Oh, the joys of cross-cultural marriage. To this day, I still can't get over the sound of a Spanish rooster. : ) Loved this video, Sarah and Billy!

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    1. Keeee Kee Deekee Kee! Or something like that??? hahahaha. Yes, this has been making us laugh non-stop. He relentlessly mocks my owl. So glad you all got a kick out of this, and thanks for sharing it!

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  5. Oh I love this. I have encountered this at work, not with my husband. (I am living in Guatemala with my Guatemalan husband.) But you are so right! We really do make animal sounds in different languages. We had an ex-Peace Corp volunteer lead a team-building activity at a work meeting involving about 25 Guatemalans and 5 gringos. We were all given a piece of paper with the name of an animal on it. We were then supposed to keep our eyes closed and find the other people in our group only by walking around making the sound of our animal. It was a disaster, as you can imagine from what you've demonstrated here. The roosters just couldn't get together! I encourage to add donkey into your repertoire to see how that went. Thanks for the laugh!

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    1. The picture you paint here makes me smile. I love the idea of everyone wandering around making random sounds that are unrecognizable to each other! And now you've got me curious about the donkey... a question to ask Billy! :) Thanks for reading and sharing!

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  6. haha, Mardo and I have had this conversation before too!

    My uncle is married to a Japanese woman, and I remember that once they gave one of those "see and hear" books to my niece and nephews, and even the sounds of things like ambulances and trains were different. We had a good laugh about it. I might have to try and find one of those for Micah!

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    1. I haven't even thought about other sounds! So many things to discover... :)

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  7. haha this is great. thanks! Sarah, this reminds me of different hand gestures we also have in Guatemala from the states. If Billy is like my family in Guate, he should a different gesture to measure the height of a person, chicken, horse, and flower maybe. not to mention gestures for lazy, cheap, or lots of money

    -Andres

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    1. Andres, I am so excited to ask him about this! The main gesture that I've noticed and loved (and adopted) is the flapping of the hand... almost like trying to snap fingers that translates to an "oooooooh."
      W
      e use it for like "Don't open that door, there's a serial killer there!" or "I think she's cheating on her husband" or "When your mom finds out you did that...."

      It's often accompanied by sucking of teeth and followed with "a la gran."

      This is a terrible description on so many levels, I know. It just kept getting more ridiculous so I kept writing. Ring any bells? :)

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  8. Too funny! I knew most of those with my Spanish classes, but I'm laughing at your owl! Maybe it's even different in different parts of the US because we always say it Hoo hoo or maybe whoo whoo, but always the same tone, no singing involved!

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    1. I like to give it a good sing-songy "hooo hooo" apparently!

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