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The Milk Challenge

One time I tried to explain to Billy the college campus activity of guzzling a gallon of milk… which, as you may know, turns out to be impossible and the people throw up. I don’t know… is this a common university thing or mostly popular on the small, Christian school scene?

Anyway, I was somewhat rolling my eyes at the whole practice for its general foolishness when Billy looked at me deadpan and simply said, “I don’t understand games where people waste food.”

I must admit I hadn’t really thought about it like that. 

This conversation resurfaced after a Pinterest session where I was trying to convince Billy we needed to create bins of rice and beans for Ella’s tactile play. “I really do not understand playing with food,” he told me again.

I am thankful for the global perspective that cross-cultural marriage offers. So many people in Guatemala and elsewhere (including the States) struggle with real need for nutrition and clean water. I am convicted of the wrongness of “wasting” food when that is our global reality.

6 comments

  1. Thanks for this post, Sarah.
    This is something I've been thinking about a lot the past few months. Even though we live on a tight budget, we always have enough food in our house. However, this is not always a reality for some of my neighbors as well as my brothers and sisters across the world.
    Each time this comes to my mind, Ghandi's (?) statement, "We have enough for everyone's need, but not everyone's greed" comes to mind. No, I'm not going to ship my leftovers over to Africa or wherever, BUT, I do need to be mindful of how much I take in the first place. And as I, too, look through Pinterest and see all sorts of crafts and activities created with food, I am reminded that while I "play" with food, there are others that don't even have food to eat. It's a sobering thought.

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    1. Thank you for your reflections. So important!

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  2. Sarah, Gerber and I have had a very similar conversation--- about wasting food, wasting water, etc, etc. Are most recent cross-cultural clash was me trying to explain the "validity/importance of plastic Easter eggs and new Easter dresses." I didn't get very far before I realized maybe it doesn't totally make sense : ) loved the simplicity and truth in this post!

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    1. It's always so great to hear how others are wrestling through the same questions around simplicity and lifestyle choices. And it's so interesting to have someone asking questions about our culture that we so often take for granted!

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  3. There was a rule at the child care center I worked at about sensory play and food. Not allowed...for this very reason!

    We came up with packing peanuts, shredded paper, sand, and water. And yes, the sand is messy...but with practice it gets better.

    And with the water, we would only put an inch on the bottom of a container...sometimes two inches :) and they would practice fine motor and even washing baby dolls, so the trade off seemed ok.

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    1. That's encouraging to hear how your child care center thought through that practice. And thanks for the practical suggestions! :)

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