QUOTE

Words to Explain

A while back I used a word that Billy asked me to explain. It has turned out to be a bit trickier than I expected. So I'm asking you, dear friends, to weigh in. How do you describe the word "cheesy"?

And just because I love it so much (and I think it relates), I'm including this awesome photo:

Photo source: Awkward Family Photos
By the way, if you haven't browsed the website Awkward Family Photos, clear your afternoon. I was literally crying at midnight last night laughing so hard. Here are a few fun ones to get you started: Backseat Rider, Tape (an awesome parenting moment), and The Wedding Episode. And one more for good measure: The Drop. The girl's description just made me laugh so hard. 

Okay, now seriously. Come back from that website and help me answer the question. What does "cheesy" mean?

10 comments

  1. HAHAHA "raise the roof higher"
    And to describe "cheesy," I would use the synonym, "corny." Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL. "Raise the roof higher" was one of my favorite parts!!!!

      Delete
  2. My two year old is in the incessant query phase and has been asking me several times a day to define "cheesy." I think it's one of those know-it-when-you-see-it words, which unfortunately helps neither toddlers nor English language learners. I'd say things that are cheesy are at once charming and either extremely old fashioned or cliche.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Melissa ~ Thank you for stopping by and commenting! I love that your two year old wants to understand what's cheesy. That's incredible!

      Delete
  3. In Spanish, I use the word "cursi"...but to describe it in English, I guess I would say something that is over-the-top and often times overly romantic or predictable.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I would say cliché or silly. or a combination of both? the dictionary throws in "blatantly inauthentic." :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cursi seems to be a good translation option, Carrie. Thanks for bringing it up! I appreciate both of the definitions additions from you and Tracy. Thanks!

      Delete
  5. Andres Villatoro1:36 AM

    its funny you mention this. my mom explained something as being "cursi" like a couple days ago. and i had no idea how to translate it. like it saids above. it means like super romantic and overly detailed or something. i tried to say "its like cheesy" and she's like "whats that" and i was at a loss for words. no idea. spanish is funny in how it doesnt have words for weird situations like a translation for "awkward". there isn't a lot of space for irony in the language

    ReplyDelete
  6. Apparently I use the word "cheesy" often enough in English that I was also frustrated by not having an equivalent when I speak Spanish.

    I agree with Carrie that "cursi" is a good equivalent in Spanish, but a few years ago I ended up creating the Spanglish word "quesoso" to mean "cheesy." ... Only my husband knows what I mean when I say it but hey, if you guys start using it, maybe it'll catch on ;)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Andres, the timing of our similar conversations makes me laugh. Who knew this was such a common bilingual question? And thanks for the custom translation, Tracy! Maybe we will start using "quesoso" and start a trend! :) Thank you both for reading and commenting.

    ReplyDelete

I love to hear from you! Like, seriously. It makes my day. Please feel free to respond, question, or add your perspective. Of course, please keep your words respectful. Thanks for reading and joining in the conversation!

A Life with Subtitles. All rights reserved. © Maira Gall.